300 Seconds.

Blog posts are not something that I have done consistently for a long while.
However, I feel that I am talking to people a lot more now about my beliefs and insights into coaching.
Perhaps I am more confident about expressing my views and opinions.
In an industry where the personalities and styles are unique to every coach or trainer, the goal for every single person they work with remains the same: they want to be in a better place.
Fitter.
Stronger.
Leaner.
Heavier.
More knowledgeable.
Happier.
Feel youthful again.
The list goes on and on.
So when a member of the public approaches a trainer or coach, they may be in a bad place. The coach or trainer might be their last hope. Leading up to their enquiry for your services they may have exhausted all other self-lead options.
You just never know.
Therefore, first five minutes of face to face contact with your client is more important than any other time.
Treat those initial 300 seconds like they are the final moments before your athlete steps out for a final at Wimbledon, the 100m finals at the Olympics or a World Cup final.
Let them know that they have your support, that they have the tools to do the job and when the going gets tough – and it will – you’ll be there with them every step of the way.
I hope that some reading this right now will say:
“What a load of rubbish!” 
Good, I hope you enjoyed saying that.
However let’s stop and think for a second.
A goal is a goal. The situation changes and the enormity of the challenge varies.
Yet that winning feeling of getting to the goal…
It never changes!
The first moment following success is the same in all scenarios.
You feel on top of the world!
So here comes the Debbie Downer moment, a situation I dealt with and handled this week.
An old client returned to her gym and looked to work with a trainer. She wasn’t overly fussed as to who she worked with – all that she wanted was to be in a better place.
Illness over the past year slowed her down significantly and motivation had been at a low for months.
She took the recommendation of a trainer on hand in the facility.
All in all, she spent around five minutes in the company of said trainer and she came away feeling defeated.
She became aware of a feeling of disinterest very quickly and she soon started to regret her decision to set foot back in a gym.
That’s not good enough.
I caught wind of this, and despite not operating at that facility full time any more I contacted her.
Before I hit dial though, I rummaged through my records and found all of my session notes from her time with me.
I hit the ground running and didn’t allude to the fact that it had been 18 months since our last session.
In moments I had her explaining her situation and we were then reminiscing about the ‘glory days’… and you could definitely call them that. She was fitter than before and hitting all targets set.
Then came the personal side – showing enthusiasm for not only what she did within the confines of a gym but her own personal interests. What actually motivated her was the next conversation topic.
It took five minutes to have her feeling like Michael Jordan ready to return to the Chicago Bulls and claim that “Championship Three-peat.”
As a trainer or coach you a responsible for upholding standards of care and trust for all clients, be them old or new.
She booked with me immediately and her returning session was the next day.

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